Category Archives: Meeting announcement

Meeting of November 14, 2019

Join us at 7:15 PM on Thursday, November 14, at Camden County College in the Connector Building, Room 101. This month’s topic is

Cooper Wingert and Scott Mingus on “Targeted Tracks: The Cumberland Valley Railroad in the Civil War”

The Civil War was the first conflict in which railroads played a major role. Although much has been written about their role in general, little has been written about specific lines. The Cumberland Valley Railroad, for example, played an important strategic role by connecting Hagerstown, Maryland to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Its location enhanced its importance during some of the Civil War’s most critical campaigns. Despite the line’s significance to the Union war effort, its remarkable story remains little known.

Scott Mingus, Sr.

Cooper Wingert

Cooper Wingert is the author of 12 books on the American Civil War and slavery, including Slavery and the Underground Railroad in South Central Pennsylvania, Abolitionists of South Central Pennsylvania, The Confederate Approach on Harrisburg: The Gettysburg Campaign’s Northernmost Reaches, and Harrisburg and the Civil War: Defending the Keystone of the Union. He is the recipient of the 2012 Dr. James I. Robertson, Jr. Literary Award for Confederate History, and has appeared on C-SPAN Book TV and Pennsylvania Cable Network. He is a student at Dickinson College, in Carlisle, Pa.

Scott L. Mingus, Sr. is an author, tour guide, multiple award-winning miniature wargamer, patented scientist, and history buff based near York, Pennsylvania.

Meeting of December 12, 2019

Join us at 7:15 PM on Thursday, December 12, at Camden County College in the Connector Building, Room 101. This month’s topic is

Krista Castillo (via ZOOM) on “The Illustrations of Thomas Nast: Reconstruction, Politics, and Popular Consciousness”

The period of Reconstruction remains a point of contention among scholars, academics, and amateur historians largely due to the biases and opinions passed down through the generations. It is not until we step back and view the period from the context of the time that we can begin to understand the complexity of the issues involved. The illustrations of Thomas Nast, prominently displayed in Harper’s Weekly, reveal popular attitudes towards Reconstruction politics and emerging radical ideologies. In 1864, Nast played a major role in the presidential election. During the turmoil of the Reconstruction period, Nast revealed the corruption of New York City’s Tammany Hall, which led to the toppling of Boss Tweed.

Although Thomas Nast’s reputation as an illustrator, caricaturist and political cartoonist faded into obscurity over the past one hundred years, most Americans easily recognize the symbols he created such as the Democratic Donkey, the Republican Elephant and the most popular representation of Santa Clause. Nast’s deeply rooted convictions and skill transformed his pen into a weapon poised to eradicate injustice, characteristics that remain unmatched in his craft to this day.

Krista Castillo, a native of Northeastern Ohio, came to Fort Negley as the Education Manager in 2008. In 2010, she was promoted to Museum Coordinator and Site Manager. Krista holds degrees from Mount Union College (B.A., History) and Austin Peay State University (M.A., Military History). In addition to completing internships at the William McKinley National Memorial and Museum in Canton, Ohio and at the Don F. Pratt Museum at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, Krista’s professional experience includes serving as registrar at the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center in Clarksville, Tennessee and as a receptionist at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. Krista has served as president of the Nashville Civil War Roundtable since 2009 and as a book reviewer for Civil War News since 2016. In March 2017, she was profiled by the Emerging Civil War blog in honor of Women’s History Month. Krista resides in Clarksville, Tennessee.